European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) issued a report that "found no reason to advise people against playing sports on synthetic turf containing recycled rubber granules as infill material."

SBR rubber granulate has been the subject of vociferous speculation regarding its potential toxicity to soccer players using artificial pitches containing this infill  

SBR rubber granulate has been the subject of vociferous speculation regarding its potential toxicity to soccer players using artificial pitches containing this infill  

In June 2016, the European Commission asked the ECHA to evaluate any risk to the general population, including children, professional players and workers installing or maintaining the fields from synthetic turf fields with recycled rubber infill. The ECHA's advice is based on their evaluation that there is "a very low level of concern from exposure to substances found in the granules."

The ECHA found that the concern for players and workers for lifetime cancer is very low, for metals is negligible and for phthalates, benzothiazole and methyl isobutyl ketone there are no concerns. The ECHA also noted that their conclusions are consistent with those found in the recent Dutch RIVM and Washington State studies. 

A copy of the report can be found here: https://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13563/annex-xv_report_rubber_granules_en.pdf/dbcb4ee6-1c65-af35-7a18-f6ac1ac29fe4

Washington State Dept of Health conclude "artificial pitches containing rubber crumb does not cause cancer in soccer players"

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Yesterday the Washington State Department of Health (WA DOH) published one of the most detailed reports available on this issue concluding that there is no elevated risk of cancer among soccer players who play on artificial turf fields. As many of you know, the WA DOH two-year study was prompted by University of Washington Coach Amy Griffin's list of soccer players in the state with cancer. 

The report found: "We did not find the number of cancers among soccer players, select and premier players, or goalkeepers reported to the project team to be higher than expected based on Washington cancer rates for people of the same ages. Based on what we know today, the Washington State Department of Health recommends that people who enjoy soccer continue to play regardless of the type of field surface."

Link to report:

http://www.doh.wa.gov/CommunityandEnvironment/Schools/EnvironmentalHealth/SyntheticTurf

3G pitches and cancer scare

There has been a lot of press recently about the supposed link between playing on 3G pitches and the likelihood or otherwise of being exposed to a cancer risk. There is overwhelming research suggesting there is no link and this is infact an old story which the UK press have got hold of from 2014.

That said as responsible designers, specifiers and testers Sports Labs want to offer owners, Local Authorities, Clubs, School, Leisure Trusts, Facilities Management Companies a way of identifying any risk that they may perceive is associated with the use of 3G pitches containing black SBR rubber crumb. The only sure way to assess the risk is to TEST IT!

If you would like one of our engineers to come to your pitch and obtain samples which can be analysed to determine the risks posed by playing on your pitch then give us a call. If you want to make an equiry by email then email louise@sportslabs.co.uk.